Canyon Speedmax CF SLX goes big on integration

Jan Frodeno's Canyon Speedmax CF SLX

Which brings us on to fluids – and Canyon’s pro triathletes like Jan Frodeno will need plenty of them. The Speedmax CF SLX touts an integrated water bottle, developed with wheel merchant Profile Design using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) to create the most aerodynamically efficient setup possible at 50kph (31mph). Finally, there’s an integrated Garmin mount out front.

UCI legality

Don’t worry TT types – the new bike can be made 100 percent UCI legal by simply removing the integrated water bottle and fuel fairings. So same bike, just a couple of modules to remove. No aero data was available on the 2016 model at the time of writing, so it’s hard to say what speed gains it can offer time triallists.

Other highlights include a repositioned TRP front brake from the rear of the fork crown to the front, which Canyon says delivers a stiffer braking platform. The rear brake remains positioned below the bottom bracket, but is apparently a little more straightforward to adjust.

Canyon worked with ergonomics specialist Ergon to create a new shell shape for the arm rests, new extension grips and base bar grips, and say riders can look forward to enhanced road buzz damping, grip and control as a result.

Finally, the head angle has been tweaked slightly to improve the bike’s high-speed stability, but the long chainstays, long wheelbase and steep steering angle remain from 2015’s model.

Which brings us on to fluids – and Canyon’s pro triathletes like Jan Frodeno will need plenty of them. The Speedmax CF SLX touts an integrated water bottle, developed with wheel merchant Profile Design using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) to create the most aerodynamically efficient setup possible at 50kph (31mph). Finally, there’s an integrated Garmin mount out front.

UCI legality

Don’t worry TT types – the new bike can be made 100 percent UCI legal by simply removing the integrated water bottle and fuel fairings. So same bike, just a couple of modules to remove. No aero data was available on the 2016 model at the time of writing, so it’s hard to say what speed gains it can offer time triallists.

Other highlights include a repositioned TRP front brake from the rear of the fork crown to the front, which Canyon says delivers a stiffer braking platform. The rear brake remains positioned below the bottom bracket, but is apparently a little more straightforward to adjust.Canyon worked with ergonomics specialist Ergon to create a new shell shape for the arm rests, new extension grips and base bar grips, and say riders can look forward to enhanced road buzz damping, grip and control as a result.

Finally, the head angle has been tweaked slightly to improve the bike’s high-speed stability, but the long chainstays, long wheelbase and steep steering angle remain from 2015’s model.

 

[“source-cyclingnews”]